fast-heartburn-relief

Fast Relief For Heartburn

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fast-heartburn-relief

When heartburn hits, you need a fast and reliable way of dealing with the pain.

But before you take another antacid, or prescription like Nexium, Prilosec, or Prevacid, there’s something I want to share with you.

Heartburn drugs actually make your condition worse over time. And there’s new evidence they boost your risk of heart attack by up to 20%.

I know it’s frustrating to hear another prescription drug is doing terrible things to your body.

But today, I’ll show you a few options that will shut down heartburn almost immediately.

These options are safe, affordable, and easy to use.

Let me explain.

More Trouble Linked to Heartburn Drugs

You may have seen the headlines recently. They confirm something I’ve known about heartburn drugs for years, and why I don’t prescribe them.

These drugs increase your risk of heart attack by around 15% to 20%.

The reason is a powerful molecule called nitric oxide (NO).

Heartburn drugs, called proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), block the production of nitric oxide, causing your blood vessels to become stiff and narrow. This leads to a lack of oxygen, which can cause a heart attack.

This effect was confirmed by the latest study.

The lead researcher in the new study, Dr. Nigam H. Shah of Stanford University, concluded:1

“[G]iven the underlying biology and the effect of these drugs in reducing nitric oxide in the blood vessel walls, the observed association is not super surprising…”

If you’re a regular reader, you know how much I value nitric oxide. It’s a super nutrient that increases your lung power, helps your heart pump blood and oxygen to your cells, and even helps your bedroom performance by allowing blood vessels to expand and relax when you need it.

Nitric oxide is something you need more of … not less of … and that’s the real trouble with heartburn drugs.

Like most nutrients, your body makes less nitric oxide as you age, and that’s a problem.

Of course, the big drug companies don’t care if your reserve of nitric oxide sinks like a stone. They make over $14 billion a year from doctors handing out over 100 million heartburn drug prescriptions.

But you don’t need these drugs to get rid of the burning, agonizing pain that keeps you up at night.

You can banish heartburn forever with a few simple remedies.

Get to Sleep Faster By Wiping Out Heartburn Pain

If you’re like me, heartburn kicks in when you lay down to go to sleep.

One reason for that is your lower esophageal sphincter (LES). Your LES is the valve that connects your esophagus to your stomach. When you eat, the LES opens and allows food to enter your stomach. Then it’s supposed to close, so stomach acid doesn’t back up into your esophagus.

When this valve gets tense, it doesn’t close properly, and that can be a cause of heartburn.

If this is the cause of YOUR heartburn, taking magnesium can help. Magnesium is a calming and relaxing mineral, and it helps relax your LES so it closes properly.

But be sure to take magnesium chloride. This form of magnesium is better absorbed and is more likely to help your heartburn. Take about 450 mg once or twice a day and see if that helps. Depending on the brand, you’ll see each dose contains about 150 mg of magnesium and about 350 mg of chloride.

Here’s another option.

Baking soda.

The secret is in the chemistry.

Baking soda contains bicarbonate, which is a base that neutralizes acid. If you remember your high school chemistry, you know bicarbonates help balance your pH, making it less acidic and more alkaline.

That means baking soda can neutralize the acid in your stomach.

It’s as easy as mixing half to one teaspoon of baking soda into an 8-ounce glass of water before bed. You’ll be amazed how effective it is.

Baking soda is not a long-term solution, but it’s a great quick fix. And there are no side effects.

To your good health,

Al Sears, MD

Al Sears, MD, CNS


1. Kathryn Doyle, “Certain Heartburn Drugs Linked to Increased Risk of Heart Attack,” Scientific American, June 10, 2015

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