PACE

The 12-minute memory makeover

A new study from the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease showed a 47% boost in memory when people did cardio.

The researchers were thrilled.

I suppose they were proud of themselves for figuring out that getting more oxygen to your brain supports your memory.

But they’re selling themselves short.

Cardio is better than nothing, but it’s a puny effort for getting a rush of oxygen to your brain.

And consider this: The people in the study had to do cardio for up to 40 minutes a day, 5 days a week. That sounds like hard work.

Today, I’ll show you how to get 400% more oxygen to your brain in as little as 12 minutes.

Better Than Cardio for Boosting Blood Flow to the Brain

My PACE program uses short bursts of high-intensity exertion followed by rest.

Start with just 4 minutes and then take a break. Do that two more times for a total of 12 minutes of exertion. That’s it.

You’ll give your brain a rush of fresh oxygen unmatched by anything else… including cardio. You’ll feel energized and alert… and you’ll improve your memory over time.

Here’s how to get started.

  1. Take your pulse and determine your heart rate at rest. The easiest way is to feel for your pulse right next to your windpipe. Count the number of beats for 6 seconds and multiply by 10. That is your resting heart rate per minute.
  2. Now walk, run, sprint, do jumping jacks, use an elliptical machine, swim laps, or whatever you can handle. Start at a speed and level of intensity that feels comfortable to you and go for 4 minutes.
  3. Rest and recover.
  4. Do another set and increase your level of exertion until you are panting slightly after 4 minutes.
  5. Now check your pulse again and determine your heart rate.
  6. Then recover.
  7. Do a third set, but increase the intensity again until you are out of breath and can’t finish a sentence by the end of 4 minutes.
  8. Recover again.

That’s it!

To see some more examples of my PACE program in action, visit my YouTube page here.

To Your Good Health,

Al Sears, MD, CNS